What is Personalised Health, Medicine & Epigenetics?

Personalised medicine is, firstly, the recognition that each individual patient or participant is unique. Epigenetics literally means ‘on’ or ‘around’ (Epi-) the genes, and describes the interaction of changes in the environment in context with the genes of the individual. Having an understanding the interplay between genetics, epigenetics and other related areas of health science allows the accurate differentiation in interventions required for the same disease in 2 individuals with different aetiologies. Furthering this, it gives insight into how treatment strategies will evolve and change for the same individual over time.
ph360 is the world’s first platform to harness the use of this information to create usable outputs for individuals. The technology uses data points from 15 areas of science including: genetics, epigenetics, endocrinology, phenotypology, chronobiology, neuropsychology, nutrigenomix, ancestry & lineage, semeiotics, exposomics, geomedicine, ayurveda, traditional chinese medicine, anthropometry and embryology. Collating this information using a systems biology approach allows accurate quantification of phenotype, genotype and informs specific recommendations based on the individual’s current health in the context of their genetic expression.

Dive deeper into the Personalised Medicine conversation

Webinar 1 – Case Studies in Personalised Health

Dr Cam McDonald (PhD), explains the use of ph360 in a clinical setting, and how the outputs inform specific health interventions. Examples include: heart disease, digestive conditions, auto-immune diseases and more.

About the Speaker:

Dr Cam McDonald (PhD) – Accredited Practising Dietitian and Accredited Exercise Physiologist, Associate Lecturer at the University of Queensland, Australia

Webinar 2 - Personalised Medicine concepts and science

Dr Alberto Garoli outlines the integration of sciences included in the ph360 platform. Information spans from the correlations of traditional medicines in the context of advanced modern science, to the construction of complex algorithms that allow usable computation of comprehensive health data.

About the Speaker:

Dr Alberto Garoli OMD, BAMS – Lecturer at the Italian College of Osteopathy (C.I.O), Italian School for Oriental Medicine (ScuolaTao) and University Sapienza of Rome.

Webinar 3 - Personalised Medicine concepts and impact on public health records

Dr Sam Manger outlines the need for more personalised medicine on a public health and individual health front. This webinar describes how personalised medicine can be used currently, and how the science will progress to meet the demands of our greatest health challenges to date.

About the Speaker:

Dr Sam Manger MBBS, BSc, FRACGP. Medical Educator, James Cook University; Board Member, National Board of Australasian Lifestyle Medicine Association. Practising General Physician Sunshine Coast, Australia.

What sciences are involved in Personalised Health & Medicine?

In order to truly understand a unique individual’s health status, we must first understand their “whole” story that allowed them to be at this moment in time. Their morphology, biology, and current physiology is a great starting snapshot, and when we overlay this with demographical data such as their age, gender, culture and genetic lineage, and compound with lifestyle factors such as activity, stress, diet and climate, then we start to get more of an understanding of who is in front of us and the complex and dynamic interplay of systems and processes that represents their health status or lack thereof at any given moment in time.
Download a concise history of Personalised Health at the button below.

Anthropometry

Anthro
Anthropometry can be said to have started in mid-1800s when doctors were still very much in contact with ancient medicines whilst new paradigms they needed to understand were emerging. Aquilla di Giovanni, a doctor teaching at university of Bologna, created the first way of classifying people according to specific morphology. Since the 1600s, the idea of measuring and putting data together had been at the fore but it wasn’t until the 1800s that the classification of phrases, types, and evidence to back up findings came about. In 1890 di Giovanni published the text “The Morphology of Human Body” where he explained all the correlations between the structures of the body, body shapes and certain diseases. In modern anthropometry, it is known that every measurement has a specific ratio when harmony is maintained. Anthropometric measurements are thus used as markers of health and disease, not only on their own but one in relation to another. We suggest you continue your research here

Endocrinology

Endocrinology studies the physiology and pathology of endocrine glands. Endocrine glands produce hormones that sustain metabolism, control sexual secondary characteristics, regulate temperature, influence behaviour, personality and mood, and many other physiological functions. Amongst most organs in the body, endocrine glands are probably the most important in relation to body shape and the quality of tissues. For example, a low function of the thyroid during development, due to lack of oligo elements or essential nutrients could influence the phenotype by changing its expression independently from the genetic makeup. And the production and levels of hormones can significantly influence our thoughts, actions and behaviours. We suggest you continue your research here
Endocrinology

Embryology

Embryology
Embryology refers to the full developmental biology throughout the full life spectrum – from “pre-womb to tomb”. It offers us specific insight into the physiological development of the human body, and the links between various organs, systems and functions. And because there are many epigenetic factors that influence our development, by understanding our specific physiology we can better understand how much our phenotype can be influenced and which epigenetic factors may be most influential. We suggest you continue your research herehere and here.

Ancestry & Genetic Lineage

Genetic lineage has a significant influence on our ideal environment and lifestyle, and subsequent defense systems for our health. For example, a person with genetic history from England who is living in Australia will be more prone to sunburn and diseases of a hot environment. As we learn more about our dominant and recessive genes, the morphism and evolution of genetic material over time periods, and the predispositions or risks that exist based on our genotype and our surroundings, we further understand that our genes play an important role in our framework or blueprint but do not exclusively determine our future.
DNA-Personal-Health-2

Neuropsychology

Brain-waves-Sinus-Waves
It has been widely accepted that human conscious activity seems to be highly related to brain cortical activity, however conscious activity has been demonstrated anecdotally with minimal or nil activity via electroencephalography. Subconscious processes refer to all physiological functions that we do not consciously influence. They are autonomic in essence but can be highly disrupted by cognitive and cortical stress. Stress patterns always correspond to a specific amount of neurotransmitters and hormones released with the obvious effect on health, physiology and disease. Stress can be induced by unsuitable habits and incorrect patterning or functioning of the brain for certain individuals, thus influencing the organism and the expression of the phenotype through stress-related conditions.

Phenotypology

Our physical traits and characteristics offer deep insight into the health or dysfunction of our body. Signs such as striations in fingernails may indicate mineral deficiencies, cracked skin vitamin deficiency, finger length may indicate hormonal dominance, texture of the tongue organ dysfunction, and so on. When we are clear on what to analyse and know the correlating deficiencies or dysfunctions for these physical signs, then we are able to gain valuable information that can assist us in diagnosing or understanding the state of health of the human body.
Phenotype

Semeiotics

Fingernails
Semeiotics studies signs and symptoms of the human body to correctly identify, collate and interpret, through diagnostics, the origin of simple or complex diseases. It can also identify the patterns of normality and therefore those conditions that could be pathologic in certain constitutions and are normal for others, such as heart rate, cholesterol, perspiration etc. For example, a sign of low heart rate could be bradycardia in a patient and normal heart function in another, this depends on the expression of genes that contribute to form a specific body type. Semiotics can offer great insight into deficiencies or dysfunctions in many systems of the body and corresponding levels of vitamins, minerals and biochemical balances or imbalances.

Exposomics

Emerging sciences such as nutrigenomics, and exposomics are delving deeply in the subject of how the environment and the partial introduction of it in our body in the form of food, air, water can influence cells to activate definite functions. It is obvious that certain diet types trigger inflammation genes, and others switch them on. Investigation on which molecules trigger deeper processes such as regeneration, growth, apoptosis are also investigated. Oxidation is part of the equation of disease therefore all the practices and diet types that integrate the notion of antioxidant therapy are in fact anti-aging medicines. The process of glycation is another interesting topic that requires direct reference especially when revisiting our modern diet types rich in glucose derivatives and poor in fibers.
Exposomics

Geomedicine

GeoMedicine3
Any organism requires a specific environment to survive or thrive. The expression of genes is triggered and associated with specific physical and biochemical stimuli. Temperature can be a trigger for functions that when decoded by genes will activate thermogenesis or heat dispersal. The function of skin pigments such as melanin also depends on how the environment, spanning generations, acted as a master control for genes that needed to adapt and produce more dark skin pigment when living at locations that induced more sun exposure.
Even living most of the day indoors or outdoors, or being part of a great family or living alone can trigger definite functions, such as oxytocin release, which may reduce anxiety and increase trust. Even your natural talents and career choices may influence certain genes to express and others to remain unexpressed.

Molecular Biology

Any organism requires a specific environment to survive or thrive. The expression of genes is triggered and associated with specific physical and biochemical stimuli. Temperature can be a trigger for functions that when decoded by genes will activate thermogenesis or heat dispersal. The function of skin pigments such as melanin also depends on how the environment, spanning generations, acted as a master control for genes that needed to adapt and produce more dark skin pigment when living at locations that induced more sun exposure.
Even living most of the day indoors or outdoors, or being part of a great family or living alone can trigger definite functions, such as oxytocin release, which may reduce anxiety and increase trust. Even your natural talents and career choices may influence certain genes to express and others to remain unexpressed.
Neural network

Chronobiology

Circadian RHythm
“Chrono” means time and “Biology” means the study of life. Chronobiology creates a lifestyle according to specific changes which are innate in your body. This means we have an internal clock and this internal clock determines the production of hormones and, when coupled with exposure to light, it creates photoperiodism. The earth rotates so there is sun at midday and when the sun goes down at 6 o’clock for example, there is no more thermal emission, no more ultra violet and, so on. The rhythms are all driven by the fact that we are living on a sphere that rotates, and we have an internal adaptation system – our circadian clock – to try to adapt to these rhythms. The adaptation mechanism in our hypothalamus tries to predict and adapt the temporal rhythms, daily, weekly, seasonally, annually and so on, and coordinates all of our instinctual body clocks.

What is Applied Personalised Health & Medicine?

It is known fact that two people with different genetic backgrounds will respond differently to the same health treatment. In fact, one exercise, or a particular food can protect from disease in one person, while in another it can cause harm. This goes too for communications, rewards, motivations, relationships and all aspects of life. When an individual resonates with a treatment, service or message on an inherently physiological level, then acceptance and understanding are more prevalent.
Knowing this, it is critical now more than ever that the advice you are giving is based on what is BEST for the individual in front of you – it is guaranteed that they are different to your previous client even if they have the same concerns.
From your reading above, you will note the simple system of HealthTypes that has been introduced with Shae. Visit healthtypetest.org to complete the free resource yourself and watch the videos below for more information.

How does Personalisation extend further than just medicine?

The concept of Personalisation affords us correlations of neuroscience and functional neurophysiology that allows us to understand how unique individuals think, learn, connect and engage and the experiences they seek, need, want and resonate with.

 

Opportunities for Integrating Personalisation into BUPA include:
  • New Personalised Experience trial offer for current members
  • Personalised Health App trial offer for current members
  • Corporate Wellness technology integration discovery call
  • Personalised Health training for current Health Provider network (live or virtual)
  • Personalised Education series for current & new members
  • Telehealth coach training programs & personalised framework (internal healthcare staff)
  • Member group health coaching framework, infrastructure, setup, training & management
  • Preventative care program review → integrate personalised epigenetic framework & increase engagement (to improve outcomes / reduce claims costs)
  • Personalise chronic disease management programs & improve outcomes
  • Predictive health risk technology integration
  • Predictive Claims & Personalised Health Risk Analysis
  • Marketing/Communication workshop for staff on personalised language and profiling
  • Member profiling campaign and re-engagement campaign
  • Personalised Member Onboarding system/process (automated engagement)
  • Community growth strategies & Member experience overhaul – communication, experience, engagement, ambassador considering generation, age, culture, gender, social status, lifestyle
  • Personalised communication profiling system for the entire company (all divisions)

Want to dive even deeper?

Join us for a LIVE course in your local area: